Nested try...except Statements in Python

Nested try...except Statements in Python

Vaibhav Vaibhav Jan-22, 2022 Nov-03, 2021 Python Python Statement

The try...except statement is used in Python to catch exceptions or run some code prone to errors. Every programming language has this feature these days, but in Python, it goes by these words and is represented by try...except keywords, respectively. Apart from try...except, another keyword, namely, finally, could also be used together with them.

Like for loops, these try, catch, and finally statements can also be nested, and In this article, we will talk about it.

Nested try...except Statements in Python

As mentioned above, we can nest these statements the same way we nest for loops. Refer to the following code for an example.

a = {
    "a": 5,
    "b": 25,
    "c": 125
}

try:
    print(a["d"])
except KeyError:
    try:
        print("a:", a["a"])
    except:
        print("No value exists for keys 'a' and 'd'")
    finally:
        print("Nested finally")
finally:
    print("Finally")

Output:

a: 5
Nested finally
Finally

As we can see, the above program first initializes a dictionary with some key-value pairs and then tries to access the value for the key d. Since no key-value pair exists, a KeyError exception is raised and caught by the except statement. Then the interpreters run the code under the nested try block. Since a value exists for key a, it is printed to the console, and the code under the nested finally statement is executed. Lastly, the code under the outer finally statement is executed.

This means that we can put try, catch, and finally statements under any try, catch, and finally statements. Let understand this with an example. We will write some code that has try, catch, and finally statements and all these statements also have try, catch, and finally statements under them.

a = {
    "a": 5,
    "b": 25,
    "c": 125,
    "e": 625,
    "f": 3125,
}

try:
    try:
        print("d:", a["d"])
    except:
        print("a:", a["a"])
    finally:
        print("First nested finally")
except KeyError:
    try:
        print("b:", a["b"])
    except:
        print("No value exists for keys 'b' and 'd'")
    finally:
        print("Second nested finally")
finally:
    try:
        print("c:", a["c"])
    except:
        print("No value exists for key 'c'")
    finally:
        print("Third nested finally")

Output:

a: 5
First nested finally
c: 125
Third nested finally

As we can see, first, the outer try block is executed. Since no value is found for key d, the code under the nested except statement is executed, and the nested finally. Since the outer try block did not get any exceptions during the execution, its except block is skipped, and the code under the outer finally block is executed.

We can even take this further as we want and create n levels of nested try, catch, and finally statements. But as the number of nested levels increases, the control flow or execution flow gets a bit complicated and unmanageable. It becomes challenging to navigate through the try, catch, and finally statements.

Vaibhav Vaibhav avatar Vaibhav Vaibhav avatar

Vaibhav is an artificial intelligence and cloud computing stan. He likes to build end-to-end full-stack web and mobile applications. Besides computer science and technology, he loves playing cricket and badminton, going on bike rides, and doodling.

LinkedIn GitHub

Related Article - Python Statement

  • Python Multiple if Statements on One Line
  • Python Multi-Line if Condition
  • if...else in One Line Python
  • The for...else Statement in Python